From my stall in the Chapel the East Window soars above drawing the eye into the detail and capturing the spiritual imagination. This is much helped by the changing time of prayer and seasons that shed light that opens up the colour and story.

The window was designed as a memorial to Prince Albert in 1862-63.At the top of the arch of the window is Our Lord in Glory; the upper section pictures the Archangels; the centre the Resurrection and the lower (pictured here) the Adoration of the Kings.

I wonder what strikes you about these details of the Nativity? The organisation, the design, drawing and painting are imaginative and skilled. The faces are delicate and the colours very fine.

Beyond this the attention and focus on the Christ child captures the whole scene. The Kings offer their gifts. The attendants in their best robes look directly at this child. In their attention there is adoration too. They see in the Christ child something worthy of reverence and even worship. There is meaning and truth and purpose. This goes even deeper as they express this in the offering of themselves and their gifts.

It is too easy to loose attention and take what is around us for granted amidst the activity and self-preoccupation of life. Next time look again at the detail and the story of this window and see in it a gentle draw into the love of God revealed in the birth of Jesus.

This childCo has the power to draw us in: it invites us to question, yes, and also to worship and to wonder; to see and search for that which can set us free for grace and love. The Nativity shows the heart of love; the sheer awe and wonder of God’s life. It promises the joy, a deep and lasting joy, which comes from knowing that we are loved by God in Christ.

 

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